Tuesday, September 9, 2008

its is a history,isnt it?

1940's and 1960's
Skateboarding was probably born sometime in the late 1940s or early 1950s when surfers in California, wanted something to surf when the waves were flat. No one knows who made the first board, rather, it seems that several people came up with similar ideas at around the same time. These first skateboarders started with wooden boxes or boards with roller skate wheels attached to the bottom. The boxes turned into planks, and eventually companies were producing decks of pressed layers of wood -- similar to the skateboard decks of today. During this time, skateboarding was seen as something to do for fun besides surfing, and was therefore often referred to as "Sidewalk Surfing".

1980's
This period was fuelled by skateboard companies that were run by skateboarders. The focus was initially on ramp skateboarding. The invention of the no-hands aerial (later known as the ollie) by Alan gefland in Florida in 1976 and the almost parallel development of the grabbed aerial by Tony Alva in California in had made it possible for skaters to perform airs on vertical ramps. While this wave of skateboarding was sparked by commercialized vert ramp skating, a majority of people who skateboarded during this period never rode vert ramps. Because most people couldn't afford to build vert ramps or didn't have access to nearby ramps, street skating gained popularity. Freestyle skating remained healthy throughout this period with pioneers such as Rodney Mullen inventing the many of the basic tricks of modern street skating such as the flat ground ollie and the kickflip. The influence freestyle had on street skating became apparent during the mid-eighties, but street skating was still performed on wide vert boards with short noses, slide rails, and large soft wheels. Skateboarding, however, evolved quickly in the late 1980s to accommodate the street skater. Since few skateparks were available to skaters at this time, street skating pushed skaters to seek out shopping centres and public and private property as their "spot" to skate. Public opposition, and the threat of lawsuits, forced businesses and property owners to ban skateboarding on their property. By 1992, only a small fraction of skateboarders remained as a highly technical version of street skating, combined with the decline of vert skating, produced a sport that lacked the mainstream appeal to attract new skaters.

miscellaneous
the use and sales skateboarding are strictly forbidden in Norway.it is due to the injuries that received causes by boards.(i wonder what they'll think about skateboarding huh?)

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